The amount of information and misinformation surrounding concussions and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) available are in equal parts. Much of the information surrounding concussions has evolved as we’ve developed better diagnostics such as MRIs and a better understanding of how the brain works.
At Bravo Imaging, we provide imaging equipment services and products, including MRIs, that are used to diagnose concussions. This diagnostic technology has revolutionized the way we treat concussions and has offered extensive insight into how to better treat patients who experience them. Test your knowledge as we explore the common myths about concussions.

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Concussion Myths

It’s important to know the correct information and misnomers surrounding concussions to better treat yourself or others who have or will experience them.

Myth #1: If you fall asleep with a concussion you will have further complications.

This is one of the biggest myths surrounding concussions today, yet you still hear stories of parents waking up their kid every 20 minutes. The most current research suggests that a concussed brain needs rest. In the first 24-hours, rest is best! You can gradually increase your activity after that timeframe as long as no symptoms, such as a headaches, are present.

Myth #2: Concussions show up immediately.

When people experience a concussion they may not even realize it, and may even continue on with what they were doing. The truth is, concussions do not show up immediately and can surface hours or days later. The common practice is “when in doubt, sit it out,” to avoid further risks.

Myth #3: The only way to prove you have a concussion is through a loss of consciousness.

This is completely a myth because research has found that over 90 percent of concussions occur without the loss of consciousness. More commonly experienced is vertigo, headaches, and sleep issues, followed by memory loss and mood disturbances.

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Myth #4: If someone loses consciousness on the field you should move them promptly.

If a player is unconscious our instinctual thought may be to move them, but you should never move someone who is unconscious in case they’ve suffered a spinal cord r neck injury. Always impart the ABCs first:

A – Check the airway

B – Check for breathing

C – Check for a cardiovascular pulse.

Myth #5: Recovery time from a concussion is short.

Most think 24 hours is the perfect amount of time to recover from a concussion, but it will vary from person-to-person. Some brain injuries may never heal, so you should listen to what your body is telling you and always seek medical advice.

Myth #6: Men experience more concussions.

The rate of concussion is about the same between men and women, so no, men do not experience more concussions. The symptoms in how the sexes experience concussions may differ, men tend to report more of a headache and being forgetful, while women report being more sensitive to noise and feeling fatigued.

Myth #7: The harder you hit your head, the more damage you’ll have.

How hard you hit your head when you experience a concussion, doesn’t really factor in. The hit can be hard or soft, and a concussion can result from either one. There have been reported stories of someone falling from a deck and recovering in a day, and then there are the more tragic ones of someone getting hit by a kickball only to suffer permanent damage.

Myth #8: Only a direct hit to the head causes a concussion.

While getting hit in the head can lead to a concussion, there other events such as whiplash, or being shaken violently that can result in a concussion.

Getting correct and the most current, evidence-based information on concussions is crucial to how the person receives care during and after the concussion occurs. The most common myths being:

  • Myth #1: If you fall asleep with a concussion you will have further complications.
  • Myth #2: Concussions show up immediately.
  • Myth #3: The only way to prove you have a concussion is through a loss of consciousness.
  • Myth #4: If someone loses consciousness on the field you should move them promptly.
  • Myth #5: Recovery time from a concussion is short.
  • Myth #6: Men experience more concussions.
  • Myth #7: The harder you hit your head, the more damage you’ll have.
  • Myth #8: Only a direct hit to the head causes a concussion.

For premier medical imaging repair and imaging equipment services, connect with us at Bravo Imaging today!